Woodside High School

13450 Woodside Lane     Newport News, VA 23608     Phone: (757) 886-7530     Fax: (757) 877-0480

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Advanced Placement Program

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The College Board  s Advanced Placement Program  (AP  ) enables students to pursue college-level studies while still in high school. Through more than 30 courses, each culminating in a rigorous exam, AP provides willing and academically prepared students with the opportunity to earn college credit, advanced placement, or both. Taking AP courses also demonstrates to college admission officers that students have sought out the most rigorous course work available to them.

At Woodside High School we offer 22 AP courses. Our courses are modeled upon a comparable college course, and aligned with college-level standards. Our talented and dedicated AP teachers help our students in the classrooms to develop and apply the content knowledge and skills they will need later in college.

Each AP course concludes with a college-level assessment developed and scored by college and university faculty as well as experienced AP teachers. AP Exams are an essential part of the AP experience, enabling students to demonstrate their mastery of college-level course work. Performing well on an AP Exam means more than just the successful completion of a course; it is a gateway to success in college. Research consistently shows that students who receive a score of 3 or higher on AP Exams typically experience greater academic success in college and have higher graduation rates than their non-AP peers.

All NNPS students who take AP courses must take the corresponding AP test in order to earn the full weighted credit for the course. Newport News Public Schools will pay for AP tests to be given to all students enrolled in appropriate courses. Advanced Placement Examinations are administered in May of each year. In June, the examinations are graded on a five-point scale:

5 = extremely well qualified; 4 = well qualified; 3 = qualified; 2 = possibly qualified; and 1 = no recom- mendation.

Additional AP studies are available at www.collegeboard.org/research.

 

AP Arts

Ms. Moore

AP Music Theory

AP Music Theory corresponds to two semesters of a typical introductory college music theory course covering topics such as musicianship, theory, musical materials, and procedures. Students develop the ability to recognize, understand, and describe basic materials and processes of music that are heard or presented in a score. Development of aural skills is a primary objective. Students understand basic concepts and terminology by listening to and performing a wide variety of music.

Mr. Shelton

AP Studio Art

The AP Studio Art Program consists of three portfolio exams   2-D Design, 3-D Design, and Drawing   corresponding to the college foundation courses. Portfolios allow flexibility of coursework while guiding students to produce college-level quality, artistic investigation, and breadth of work. The Drawing portfolio addresses issues such as line quality, light and shade, rendering of form, composition, surface manipulation, the illusion of depth, and markmaking. Students' portfolios demonstrate skills and ideas developed, refined, and applied throughout the course to produce visual compositions. Students may choose to submit any or all of the portfolios. Portfolios are evaluated based on standardized scoring descriptors aligned with skills and understanding developed in college foundation courses.

AP Art History

The AP Art History course is equivalent to a two-semester college survey course exploring the nature of art, art making, and responses to art. By investigating specific course content of 250 works of art characterized by diverse artistic traditions from prehistory to the present, students develop in-depth, holistic understanding of the history of art from a global perspective. Students become active participants in the global art world, engaging with its forms and content. They experience, research, discuss, read, and write about art, artists, art making, responses to, and interpretations of art.

AP History & Social Sciences

AP United States History

The AP U.S. History course focuses on developing students  understanding of American history from approximately 1491 to the present. The course has students investigate the content of U.S. history for significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in nine historical periods, and develop and use the same thinking skills and methods (analyzing primary and secondary sources, making historical comparisons, chronological reasoning, and argumentation) employed by historians when they study the past. The course also provides seven themes (American and national identity; migration and settlement; politics and power; work, exchange, and technology; America in the world; geography and the environment; and culture and society) that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places.

Mr. Reed

  Hakuna Matata 

Mr. Brady

  The greatness of the United States is our ability to allow every generation to alter and change the place while holding onto our Founding and traditional principles. 

Mr. Cook

  Psychology, the only subject in school that you will always take with you and can always be applied, regardless of where you may find yourself"

AP Psychology

This course introduces students to the systematic and scientific study of human behavior and mental processes. While considering the psychologists and studies that have shaped the field, students explore and apply psychological theories, key concepts, and phenomena associated with such topics as the biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and cognition, motivation, developmental psychology, testing and individual differences, treatment of abnormal behavior, and social psychology. Throughout the course, students employ psychological research methods, including ethical considerations, as they use the scientific method, analyze bias, evaluate claims and evidence, and effectively communicate ideas.

Mr. Brady

  Carpe Diem-Being the smart one is cool  .. 

AP World History

The AP World History course focuses on developing students' understanding of world history from approximately 8000 B.C.E. to the present. The course has students investigate the content of world history for significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in six historical periods, and develop and use the same thinking skills and methods (analyzing primary and secondary sources, making historical comparisons, chronological reasoning, and argumentation) employed by historians when they study the past. The course also provides five themes (interaction between humans and the environment; development and interaction of cultures; state building, expansion, and conflict; creation, expansion, and interaction of economic systems; and development and transformation of social structures) that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places encompassing the five major geographical regions of the globe: Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Oceania.

Ms. Gower-Kinney

"AP Government: your tax dollars hard at work. 

AP United States Government and Politics

This course introduces students to key political ideas, institutions, policies, interactions, roles, and behaviors that characterize the political culture of the United States. The course examines politically significant concepts and themes, through which students learn to apply disciplinary reasoning, assess causes and consequences of political events, and interpret data to develop evidence-based arguments.

 

Mr. Cook

  AP Human Geography is teaching you the why of the where since 2000. 

AP Human Geography

The AP Human Geography course is equivalent to an introductory college-level course in human geography. The course introduces students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth's surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine socioeconomic organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their research and applications. The curriculum reflects the goals of the National Geography Standards (2012).

AP Language Arts

Ms. France

  Nothing in literature is an accident. Everything means something! 

AP English Literature & Composition

The AP English Literature and Composition course aligns to an introductory college-level literary analysis course. The course engages students in the close reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature to deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure. As they read, students consider a work  s structure, style, and themes, as well as its use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. Writing assignments include expository, analytical, and argumentative essays that require students to analyze and interpret literary works.

Ms. Brandt

AP English Language and Composition

The AP English Language and Composition course aligns to an introductory college-level rhetoric and writing curriculum, which requires students to develop evidence-based analytic and argumentative essays that proceed through several stages or drafts. Students evaluate, synthesize, and cite research to support their arguments. Throughout the course, students develop a personal style by making appropriate grammatical choices. Additionally, students read and analyze the rhetorical elements and their effects in non- fiction texts, including graphic images as forms of text, from many disciplines and historical periods.

  In his autobiography, Frederick Douglass wrote,   Once you learn to read, you will be forever free,  and by learning to read, Douglass wrote his own inspirational story of slavery to freedom. The art of reading and writing analytically for a variety of purposes and for a variety of audiences gives the author power to move people whether that be one  s peers, parents, teachers, or a nation. We have all heard the phrase   knowledge is power,  and that knowledge starts with the ability to read and write which is the foundation and the gateway to be successful in all areas of life. To be successful in math, science, social students, world languages, etc., one must first know how to critically read for that particular subject  s purpose in order to effectively synthesize one  s own response to solve a problem, research a hypothesis, promote civic competence, or encourage understanding of our multi-cultural world. 

AP Mathematics

Ms. Saunders

"MATHEMATICS is not about numbers, equations, computations, or algorithms: it is about UNDERSTANDING." -William Paul Thurston

AP Calculus AB/BC

AP Calculus AB/BC is roughly equivalent to a first semester college calculus course devoted to topics in differential and integral calculus. The AP course covers topics in these areas, including concepts and skills of limits, derivatives, definite integrals, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. The course teaches students to approach calculus concepts and problems when they are represented graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally, and to make connections amongst these representations. Students learn how to use technology to help solve problems, experiment, interpret results, and support conclusions.

AP Calculus BC

AP Calculus BC is roughly equivalent to both first and second semester college calculus courses and extends the content learned in AB to different types of equations and introduces the topic of sequences and series. The AP course covers topics in differential and integral calculus, including concepts and skills of limits, derivatives, definite integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and series. The course teaches students to approach calculus concepts and problems when they are represented graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally, and to make connections amongst these representations. Students learn how to use technology to help solve problems, experiment, interpret results, and support conclusions.

Mr. Bill

  Stats is fun. 

AP Statistics

The AP Statistics course is equivalent to a one-semester, introductory, non-calculus-based college course in statistics. The course introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. There are four themes in the AP Statistics course: exploring data, sampling and experimentation, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference. Students use technology, investigations, problem solving, and writing as they build conceptual understanding.

AP Sciences

Ms. Wiggins

  If you  re not having fun, you  re not doing it right. 

AP Biology

The AP Biology course is equivalent to a two-semester college introductory biology course. The AP Biology course is designed to enable you to develop advanced inquiry and reasoning skills, such as designing a plan for collecting data, analyzing data, applying mathematical routines, and connecting concepts in and across domains. The result will be readiness for the study of advanced topics in subsequent college courses   a goal of every AP course. The 4 Big Ideas are: Evolution, Cellular Processes: Energy and Communication, Genetics and Information Transfer, and Interactions.

Ms. Mina

  Mina  s AP Chem One on One Vs. College Chemistry  


AP Chemistry

The AP Chemistry course provides students with a college- level foundation to support future advanced course work in chemistry. Students cultivate their understanding of chemistry through inquiry-based investigations, as they explore topics such as: atomic structure, intermolecular forces and bonding, chemical reactions, kinetics, thermodynamics, and equilibrium. Created by the AP Chemistry Development Committee, the course curriculum is compatible with many Chemistry courses in colleges and uni- versities.

AP Environmental Science

The AP Environmental Science course is the equivalent of a one-semester, introductory college course in environmental science, through which students engage with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world. The course requires that students identify and analyze natural and human-made environmental problems, evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them. Environmental science is interdisciplinary, embracing topics from geology, biology, environmental studies, environmental science, chemistry, and geography.

Mr. Shaffer

  Something will have gone out of us as a people if we ever let the remaining wilderness be destroyed ... We simply need that wild country available to us, even if we never do more than drive to its edge and look in. 

  Wallace Stegner, The Sound of Mountain Water

Ms. Davies

  Repetition is the key to mastery. 

Mr. Entwistle

  Physics! Beating science fiction at its own game since 1897. 

AP Physics 1

AP Physics 1 is an algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course. Students cultivate their understanding of Physics through inquiry-based investigations as they explore topics such as Newtonian mechanics (including rotational motion); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound; and introductory, simple circuits.

AP World Languages and Cultures

Madame Canody

C  est la vie! Learning a new language is fun and challenging, so AP is the way to go! French culture is super interesting, so AP students leave with lots of awesome cultural knowledge. Laissez les bons temps rouler!

AP French Language and Culture

The AP French Language and Culture course emphasizes communication (understanding and being understood by others) by applying the interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational modes of communication in real-life situations. This includes vocabulary usage, language control, communication strategies, and cultural awareness. The AP French Language and Culture course strives not to overemphasize grammatical accuracy at the expense of communication. To best facilitate the study of language and culture, the course is taught almost exclusively in French.

The AP French Language and Culture course engages students in an exploration of culture in both contemporary and historical contexts. The course develops students' awareness and appreciation of cultural products (e.g., tools, books, music, laws, conventions, institutions); practices (patterns of social interactions within a culture); and perspectives (values, attitudes, and assumptions).

Seῆora Vega

  Una persona que habla dos idiomas, vale por dos 

La clase de Español AP te abre las puertas para profundizar en la cultura hispana y abrir tus horizontes a nuevas posibilidades.

AP Spanish Language and Culture

The AP Spanish Language and Culture course emphasizes communication (understanding and being understood by others) by applying the interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational modes of communication in real-life situations. This includes vocabulary usage, language control, communication strategies, and cultural awareness. The AP Spanish Language and Culture course strives not to overemphasize grammatical accuracy at the expense of communication. To best facilitate the study of language and culture, the course is taught almost exclusively in Spanish.

The AP Spanish Language and Culture course engages students in an exploration of culture in both contemporary and historical contexts. The course develops students' awareness and appreciation of cultural products (e.g., tools, books, music, laws, conventions, institutions); practices (patterns of social interactions within a culture); and perspectives (values, attitudes, and assumptions).

 

 

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